Discover The Human Scale This Saturday, 4-6pm, New Crossways, 6 Roxburgh St

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“The Human Scale” is a Danish documentary which has been a huge success at film festivals, including a sold-out festival screening in Wellington. It includes a section on the Christchurch rebuild.

Here’s the synopsis from the film’s website at http://thehumanscale.dk/the-film/:

50 % of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By 2050 this will increase to 80%. Life in a mega city is both enchanting and problematic. Today we face peak oil, climate change, loneliness and severe health issues due to our way of life. But why? The Danish architect and professor Jan Gehl has studied human behavior in cities through 40 years. He has documented how modern cities repel human interaction, and argues that we can build cities in a way, which takes human needs for inclusion and intimacy into account

Save the Basin are hosting a fundraising screening of “The Human Scale” on Saturday.

When: Saturday 22 February, 4-6pm

Where: New Crossways, Level 1, 6 Roxburgh St, Mt Victoria

How much: Recommended $10 koha at the door (no advance sales).

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/201696636694730/

We hope you’ll come along – and please let your friends, and anyone interested in retaining Wellington as a city for people, not a city for cars, know about this movie.

Wellingtonians love the Basin

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Valentine’s Day gave Wellingtonians an opportunity to share why they love the Basin Reserve precinct as it is, without a flyover. Attendees at the “Love the Basin” event wrote ‘love notes’ to the Basin Reserve and numerous passers-by waved and tooted to show their support for the cause to stop the proposed construction of a flyover at this iconic site.

Save the Basin Campaign spokesperson Tim Jones says: “Friday’s event at the Basin Reserve was a great illustration of the depth and breadth of opposition to the flyover. Wellingtonians do not want a flyover at the Basin Reserve and will not be steamrolled by the NZTA.”

Save the Basin Campaign were heartened by the number of supportive people driving past Friday’s event with bus drivers, taxi drivers, private vehicle owners and even a couple of people driving Wellington City Council vans tooting to show their support for the cause.

A selection of love notes written at the event are below, with the full listing posted on the Community Gallery page of Save the Basin’s website.

I love the Basin because…

“I had school sports here as a girl and played cricket and enjoyed attending marching girls and soccer.”

“It’s one of the most beautiful cricket grounds in the world and it deserves to stay that way.”

“It’s part of our heritage.”

“It’s a unique cricket ground. I hate the flyover because it’s a short-sighted solution and Wellington does not need it!”

“It’s a MASSIVE KIWI ICON.”

“It’s my one week away from Chch to enjoy cricket, sun, relaxing and views.”

“It’s been a home for cricket since I was a baby…”

“On my trips to Wellington I always take the time to get down to the Basin to have a wander around or take photos of the ground from outside the gates. The Basin holds a special place to me since I love cricket.”

Loving the Basin

Today is Valentine’s Day. It’s the first day of the second Test between New Zealand and India at the Basin Reserve. And today is also the day of our Love the Basin event at the Basin Reserve.

Many people love the Basin Reserve as a cricket ground, but the Basin has been used for many things in its time, and people love it for many reasons. Here’s why fashion designer Laurie Foon says she loves the Basin:

Thanks for all the great work you are doing, please keep it up.

I love the Basin as I ride my bike and this is is always my mellow interlude before approaching the city or the busy Adelaide Road.

I often stop on the south side to west side to sit in the late evening sun. I do not want the noise or visual of the flyover.

But the Love the Basin event is taking place against a background of backroom deals: backroom deals about the future of world cricket, and as recent revelations by Wellington Scoop show, backroom deals between Wellington City Council, the Basin Reserve Trust and the New Zealand Transport Agency:

Conflicts of interest: a secret flyover Memorandum of Understanding and its three signatories

To mix sporting metaphors, cricket has become a political football. Today at the Basin, I hope to see a celebration of the game, and a celebration of the Basin Reserve.

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Transport Experts, Labour Party Agree: Basin Reserve Flyover A Crock

Campaigners criticising a proposed project is one thing. Politicians criticising a proposed project is another thing. But when independent transport experts find gaping flaws in the claimed benefits underlying a proposal, then that proposed project has a problem.

And that’s exactly the situation with the proposed Basin Reserve flyover. A series of traffic and transportation peer review reports from consultants appointed by the Board of Inquiry has shown damning holes, inconsistencies and grossly inflated claims in NZTA’s proposals – faults that NZTA and its experts have chosen to gloss over.

You can find those reports here: http://www.epa.govt.nz/Resource-management/Basin_Bridge/ReportsAdvice/Pages/default.aspx under the heading “Traffic and Transportation peer review report” towards the bottom of the page.

Wellington Central MP Grant Robertson has highlighted one of thesee key issues in a recent press release, reported on Wellington Scoop:

Basin flyover “a colossal waste of money,” says Grant Robertson

To quote from the statement:

The travel time saved by the proposed Basin Reserve flyover amounts to only 90 seconds, not the claimed seven-and-a-half minutes, a new statement by experts and witnesses shows, Labour’s MP for Wellington Central Grant Robertson says.

“This flyover is costing $90 million but in the end will only save commuters 90 seconds. That is a colossal waste of money when they are other alternatives available to improve traffic flow.

“The claim has been made that the flyover will give seven-and-a-half minutes of travel time savings, but in material released late last week. The experts now agree six of those minutes actually come from a third lane in the Memorial Park tunnel and changes to the Taranaki Street intersection. These are completely separate developments from the flyover.

“It is significant that witnesses and experts agree on this. It puts into question the cost benefit claims about the project and should weigh heavily on the Board of Inquiry.

And of course, Grant Robertson is far from the only politician to criticise the proposed flyover. In addition to Labour, the Greens, United Future, New Zealand First and Mana have all expressed opposition to the proposed flyover. All these parties recognise a crock when they see one. It’s a pity NZTA and the Government are too blinded by their own arrogance to see the fatal flaws in its proposal.

PS: Here’s the same story covered by the Dominion Post: http://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/news/9706340/Flyover-to-shave-90-seconds-off-trip

Show Your Love For The Basin This Valentine’s Day

The Save the Basin Campaign is calling on Wellingtonians to show their love for the Basin Reserve this Valentine’s Day, Friday 14th February, which is also with the first day of the second test match between New Zealand and India.

Attendees at the “Love the Basin” event, to be held at the northern entrance to the Basin, will be invited to write a note stating why they love this iconic part of our city. Save the Basin Campaign spokesperson Tim Jones says: “This is an opportunity for the community to share the many reasons we love the Basin Reserve and why we continue to oppose construction of the proposed flyover on the ground’s northern boundary.”

Tim Jones says that supporters of Save the Basin Campaign have rallied behind the cause for many reasons. These range from the heritage values of the precinct and the fact that it is a world class test-playing venue, through to the unnecessary and ugly nature of the proposed flyover. “There are also many Wellingtonians who enjoy and use the Basin as an open green space with views to the surrounding Town Belt.”

The Save the Basin Campaign is one of a number of community groups and numerous individual citizens who are currently involved in the Board of Inquiry process to review the NZTA’s application for resource consent to build a flyover at the northern end of the Basin Reserve. A final decision is due out later in the year.

The “Love the Basin” event will start at 10am and is being held at the northern end of the Basin Reserve, near the C.S. Dempster Gate. A speech and opportunity for photographs will be held at approximately 10.20am. The event will go ahead regardless of the weather and those that are unable to attend are asked to send a message stating why they love the Basin Reserve to stoptheflyover@gmail.com.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/201680093364430/

Big Media Interest In Basin Reserve Flyover Hearings

There has been a lot of media interest in the Board of Inquiry hearing on NZTA’s proposed Basin Reserve flyover, which began this week and is currently scheduled to run for eight weeks. Save the Basin’s media release to mark the start of the hearings, below, got an excellent response, including coverage on both main TV channels:

Save the Basin Campaign hopes for a fair and thorough Board of Inquiry hearing

The Board of Inquiry hearing into the motorway flyover the New Zealand Transport Agency is proposing to build at the Basin Reserve cricket ground in central Wellington begins today, Monday 3 February, and is scheduled to last for two months.

Save the Basin Campaign spokesperson Tim Jones said “The Save the Basin Campaign will play a full part in the hearing. We have a very strong case that clearly shows why the proposed Basin Reserve flyover should not be approved by the Board. We’re looking forward to presenting that case to the Board and to the public.”

However, Tim Jones said that the Board of Inquiry process, run by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) and set up by the current Government to push through resource consent applications for projects it favours within a nine-month time frame, has many flaws.

“That nine-month time frame has meant that submitters, expert witnesses, and the Board itself have been placed under extraordinary pressure by unrealistically short deadlines,” Tim Jones commented. “At times, submitters have been given as little as one working day to respond to demands from the EPA for information. That’s completely unacceptable.”

“Now that the Board hearing is underway,” Mr Jones said, “Save the Basin is looking forward to a hearing that will be fair, unbiased, thorough, and take all the time needed to hear and consider the many complex issues NZTA’s deeply flawed proposal raises.”

“The Human Scale” Fundraising Film Screening, Sat 22 Feb, 4-6pm, New Crossways

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We hope you’ll turn up to show your love for the Basin Reserve on Valentine’s Day, 14 February, at 10am, but there’s another opportunity to help Save the Basin later this month – and watch an award-winnng film while you do so.

“The Human Scale” is a Danish documentary which has been a huge success at film festivals, including a sold-out festival screening in Wellington. Here’s the synopsis from the film’s website at http://thehumanscale.dk/the-film/:

50 % of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By 2050 this will increase to 80%. Life in a mega city is both enchanting and problematic. Today we face peak oil, climate change, loneliness and severe health issues due to our way of life. But why? The Danish architect and professor Jan Gehl has studied human behavior in cities through 40 years. He has documented how modern cities repel human interaction, and argues that we can build cities in a way, which takes human needs for inclusion and intimacy into account

Save the Basin are hosting a fundraising screening of “The Human Scale” this month.

When: Saturday 22 February, 4-6pm

Where: New Crossways, Level 1, 6 Roxburgh St, Mt Victoria

How much: Recommended $10 koha at the door (no advance sales).

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/201696636694730/

This is your chance to help us pay for for our legal and publicity to oppose NZTA’s planned flyover – a project which would stand in absolute contradiction to everything “The Human Scale” is about.

Awards won

Aljazeera Int. Documentary Film Festival 2013- Winner of the Child and Family Award for Long Film

Planete Doc, Warsaw 2013 – Green Cross Award

Kinookus, Croatia 2013 – Best Feature Documentary

Youth Award – Bergen International Film Festival 2013